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Forged in war

Fox defeated and expansion northwest


Convinced that the Fox were hatching a plot with the British and Iroquois to drive the French out of the Great Lakes, the Detroit commandant Dubuisson, aided by native allies of the French, launched a pre-emptive raid in 1712. The Fox and their allies fled to Green Bay where they retaliated against the Illinois. In 1716 a second French campaign, under Louvigny, imposed an uneasy peace on the Fox. Incited by British merchants, the Chickasaw, living in the northern part of the present state of Mississippi, raided French and Illinois settlements.

In 1726 the French concluded a peace with the Fox and reopened trade with the Dakota. The Fox objected to French trade with enemies and resumed hostilities. After expeditions by de Lignery (1728) and de Noyelles (1730, 1734), aided by native allies of the French, Fox resistance was broken and the Green Bay-Dakota area reopened to trade. At the same time La Vérendrye penetrated the Hudson’s Bay Company trading hinterland, initiating a marked decline in the fur returns at Fort Albany and York Factory. In 1736 he achieved a peace between Saulteaux and Cree. The Dakota, angered by the defection of Saulteaux to their enemies, turned on them, thus instigating migration of some of the Ojibwa groups into Cree territory of Lake Superior.

French expeditions against the increasingly troublesome Chickasaw in 1736 and 1739 led to a negotiated peace in 1740. English influence, however, continued to expand. Traders from Pennsylvania and Virginia increased their overtures to the Miami; native groups allied to the British continued to settle the Ohio valley, and after 1726 Fort Oswego became an increasingly active trading place for the Mississauga of southern Ontario.

Click for more on information on the development of trade.



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Seven Years’ War


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Quiz :

Why did Canada insist on signing the Versailles peace treaty on its own behalf in 1919?

Sense of independent nationhood
Defiance of Britain
Economic strength