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First Peoples

Eastern woodlands


Two major language groups dominated this culture. Algonquian speaking Ojibwa, Algonquins, Mi’kmaq, and Malaseet occupied land from Lake Superior to the Atlantic. The Iroquoian-speaking tribes included the Huron, located in southern Ontario, and the Iroquois, the Mohawk and others who lived in villages south of the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence. Iroquoian speakers had a warring tradition. Men hunted and fished; women cultivated beans, maize, squash, and tobacco. When the soil was depleted in one place, they moved to new sites. The Algonquian speakers’ lives were governed by the seasons: hunting in fall and winter; harvesting roots and berries in summer.

Synopsis

Six major cultural groups The animation starts with a map of Canada. Following the narration, the six regions corresponding to the six First Peoples’ cultural groups are each labelled and shown in their individual colours. Clicking on a region focuses on that region, and narration provides more specific information about the Aboriginal people living there.

Content (Narration)

Canada’s First Peoples can be divided into six major cultural regions: the Arctic; Subarctic; Pacific North-west Coast; Plateau; Plains; and Eastern Woodlands. Click on a cultural grouping to learn more.

Eastern woodlands
Two major language groups dominated this area’s cultures: the Algonquian in the north and east; and the Iroquoian in the south and west. Iroquoian speakers had a warring tradition. Men hunted and fished. while women cultivated beans, maize, squash, and tobacco. The Algonquian-speaking tribes were governed by the seasons: they hunted in fall and winter, and harvested in the summer.



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Quiz :

How many languages were spoken by Canada's First Peoples?

55
15
35