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First Peoples

Plains


The Plains culture encompassed the nomadic Assiniboine, Blackfoot, Sarcee, and Plains Cree. Other than water and poles for their tipis, the buffalo met all their needs. Its meat was eaten at every meal. Hooves were boiled into glue; sinew became thread; stomachs served as pots; horns and bones were fashioned into tools and utensils; ribs became sled runners; hides made tipi covers, clothing, moccasins, and sleeping robes; buffalo hair made comfy cradle boards. Before horses, buffalo were hunted by herding them into enclosures or over cliffs. The arrival of horses in the early 1700s gave the hunters a distinct advantage and horses became a kind of currency on the prairies. The Plains women played important roles in religious rituals.

Synopsis

Six major cultural groups The animation starts with a map of Canada. Following the narration, the six regions corresponding to the six First Peoples’ cultural groups are each labelled and shown in their individual colours. Clicking on a region focuses on that region, and narration provides more specific information about the Aboriginal people living there.

Content (Narration)

Canada’s First Peoples can be divided into six major cultural regions: the Arctic; Subarctic; Pacific North-west Coast; Plateau; Plains; and Eastern Woodlands. Click on a cultural grouping to learn more.

Plains
The Plains culture encompassed four nomadic tribes. These tribes relied on buffalo for food, shelter, clothing, and tools. When horses arrived on the prairies in the early 1700s, they gave hunters a distinct advantage and became a kind of currency on the prairies. The Plains women played important roles in religious rituals.



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Eastern woodlands


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Quiz :

How much did the aboriginal community grow during the second half of the 20th century?

Quadrupled
Sevenfold
Doubled