Canadian Geographic
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First Peoples

Arctic


With no edible vegetation, and driftwood their only wood, the Arctic Peoples — the Inuit — led a precarious life in the Far North. They hunted seals, whales, and walruses along the coastline, and followed the caribou inland. Birds, birds’ eggs, and small mammals were other food sources. Blubber, fish, and meat were eaten raw. Dog teams pulled the snow sleds they made from driftwood, whalebone, and caribou antlers. Because of their keen sense of beauty, even everyday objects were fashioned with extraordinary care. All adornments had animal motifs. Groups of up to 100 people wintered in snow house villages. Shamans and medicine men were highly regarded by these deeply spiritual people.

Synopsis

Six major cultural groups The animation starts with a map of Canada. Following the narration, the six regions corresponding to the six First Peoples’ cultural groups are each labelled and shown in their individual colours. Clicking on a region focuses on that region, and narration provides more specific information about the Aboriginal people living there.

Content (Narration)

Canada’s First Peoples can be divided into six major cultural regions: the Arctic; Subarctic; Pacific North-west Coast; Plateau; Plains; and Eastern Woodlands. Click on a cultural grouping to learn more.

The Arctic Peoples led a precarious life in the Far North. They hunted seals, whales, and walruses along the coastline, and followed the caribou inland. Birds, birds’ eggs, and small mammals were other food sources. Blubber, fish, and meat were eaten raw. Groups of up to 100 people wintered in snow house villages. Shamans and medicine men were highly regarded by these deeply spiritual people.



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On the next page:

Subarctic


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Quiz :

Indigenous Indian, Inuit, and Métis peoples comprise what percentage of Canada's population?

4.4%
2.2%
1.1%